a) stakes1            b) logcrib    

 

c) paltwr

Pictured above are the three main structure types included in this category: a) stake beds, b) log cribs, and c) wooden pallets.


Stake Beds
This structure is most often constructed using wooden stakes (as shown above or in the form of stake trees).  One state agency reported the use of river cane in the place of wooden stakes.

Click here for map of states that used this method.

Main reasons used:

  • low cost
  • ease of construction and installation
  • effectiveness

Reported advantages:

  • All reports indicate increased catch rates of sportfish, including largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides), bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus), and crappie (Pomoxis sp.).

Reported disadvantages:

  • none reported

Recommendations:

  • Structures are sometimes used in conjunction with submerged trees.

Mean reported time to create/place one structure/unit: 5 hrs (range 0.25 – 16, n=6)

Mean reported life of structure/unit: 8 yrs (range 2 – 13, n=6)

Degrees of Satisfaction:
*average ratings on a scale of 1 – 5 with 1 being very satisfied and 5 being very dissatisfied.

  • fish attractor to increase angler catch and harvest  1.5 (n=4)

Related references:

Herrig, D. J., and L. R. Miller.  1985.  Comparison of Berkley Fish Hab and stakebeds in two small Western Iowa impoundments.  Iowa Department of Natural Resources.

Johnson, D. L., and W. E. Lynch, Jr.  1992.  Panfish use of and angler success at evergreen tree, brush, and stake-bed structures.  North American Journal of Fisheries Management 12:222-229.

Petit, G. D., III.  1972.  Stake beds as crappie concentrators.  Proc. 26th Annual Southeast. Assoc. of Game and Fish Comm. 26:401-406.

Log Cribs
Log cribs consist of square log structures and may contain several layers of brush (e.g., Wisconsin log crib).

Click here for map of states that used this method.

Main reasons used:

  • availability of materials
  • low cost
  • preference for natural materials
  • longevity
  • ease of construction and installation
  • interest of anglers

Reported advantages:

  • none reported

Reported disadvantages:

  • none reported

Recommendations:

  • none reported

Mean reported time to create/place one structure/unit: 17 hrs (range 0.25 – 60, n=4)

Mean reported life of structure/unit:  25 yrs (range 15 – 50, n=4)

Degrees of Satisfaction:
*average ratings on a scale of 1 – 5 with 1 being very satisfied and 5 being very dissatisfied.

  • fish attractor to increase angler catch and harvest  1.0 (n=2)
  • recruitment  1.0 (n=2)
  • adult habitat/sanctuary  1.5 (n=2)

Wooden Pallets
These structures consist of wooden pallets that may be arranged in a variety of different forms.  Pallets may be arranged in a triangle or square and used as individual units or stacked to form pallet towers.  Individual pallets can also be placed vertically in the water column or stacked on top of each other horizontally.

Click here for map of states that used this method.

Main reasons used:

  • low cost
  • availability of materials

Reported advantages:

  • none reported

Reported disadvantages:

  • Depending on the configuration, some structures may be heavy and difficult to move.

Recommendations:

  • Structures are sometimes combined with submerged trees.

Mean reported time to create/place one structure/unit: 6 hrs (range 0.9 – 16, n=7)

Mean reported life of structure/unit:  10 yrs (range 5 – 15, n=7)

Degrees of Satisfaction:
*average ratings on a scale of 1 – 5 with 1 being very satisfied and 5 being very dissatisfied.

  • fish attractor to increase angler catch and harvest  2.1 (n=7)
  • recruitment  2.5 (n=2)

Other Structures

One agency used a floating wood platform to attract sportfish.  This structure was used due to its low cost, ability to withstand water level fluctuations, and the availability of materials.

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